Kate Middleton’s friend Rose Hanbury joins mourners at Prince Philip’s memorial

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’s friend Rose Hanbury, was among the 1,800 mourners at Prince Philip’s memorial service today.

The Marchioness of Cholmondeley, 38, is a neighbour of William and Kate’s Norfolk home Amner Hall and is regular among royal circles having previously been invited to a state banquets as well as charity events in East Anglia along side her husband, David Cholmondeley, 7th Marquess of Cholmondeley, 61.

The couple – who are worth an estimated £75million and have three children – live at the grand Houghton Hall, set in 1,000 acres close to The Queen’s Sandringham estate. 

Rose – a member of the Duchess of Cambridge’s well-born group of friends dubbed the Turnip Toffs –  looked solemn in black dress coat and drop earrings.

She appeared to be joined by her husband as they both clutched an Order of Service inside the Abbey.

Tying her brunette hair back into a low bun, she opted for a black pill box hat with leaf detail and a natural make-up look with a light black mascara and brown red lip.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’s friend Rose Hanbury, was among the 1,800 mourners at Prince Philip’s memorial service today. She is pictured with her husband 

The Marchioness of Cholmondeley, 38, is a neighbour of William and Kate’s Norfolk home Amner Hall and is regular among royal circles having previously been invited to a state banquets as well as charity events in East Anglia along side her husband, David Cholmondeley, 7th Marquess of Cholmondeley, 61. They are pictured at a gala at Houghton Hall

Houghton Hall is a stunning Palladian mansion with 106-rooms, built in the 1720s for Britain’s first Prime Minister, Sir Robert Walpole.

Kate and Prince William visited the house, just three miles away from Anmer Hall, in June 2016 to attend a charity gala to support East Anglia’s Children’s Hospices.

Rose and David attended the Cambridges’ wedding in 2011 and their twin boys Alexander and Oliver were playmates of Prince George.

The Marchioness of Cholmondeley is a regular among royal circles and was invited to a state banquet for Donald Trump at Buckingham Palace in June 2019, where she was positioned in close proximity to the US President. 

Kate Middleton's friend Rose Hanbury (pictured together in 2016) and her husband are worth an estimated £75million and have three children - live at the grand Houghton Hall, set in 1,000 acres close to The Queen's Sandringham estate.

Kate Middleton’s friend Rose Hanbury (pictured together in 2016) and her husband are worth an estimated £75million and have three children – live at the grand Houghton Hall, set in 1,000 acres close to The Queen’s Sandringham estate.

Rose and Kate are patron and royal patron respectively of the charity East Anglia Children’s Hospices, and the Duchess has attended the Houghton Hall horse trials with her children

Rose and Kate are patron and royal patron respectively of the charity East Anglia Children’s Hospices, and the Duchess has attended the Houghton Hall horse trials with her children

Kate and Prince William visited Houghton Hall, just three miles away from Anmer Hall, in June 2016 to attend a charity gala to support East Anglia's Children's Hospices

Kate and Prince William visited Houghton Hall, just three miles away from Anmer Hall, in June 2016 to attend a charity gala to support East Anglia’s Children’s Hospices

As Lord Great Chamberlain, her husband had a unique role at the State Opening of Parliament — walking backwards in front of the Queen.  

The Marquess had a string of glamorous girlfriends before marrying Rose, an ex-model 23 years his junior, in 2009.

They met at a party at the Villa Cetinale, the grand Italian home of the disgraced Tory peer Lord Lambton — Rose’s sister, Marina, is married to Lambton’s heir Ned, the Earl of Durham.

The sisters’ grandmother was Lady Elizabeth Longman, a bridesmaid at the Queen’s wedding to Prince Philip. 

Rose and Kate are patron and royal patron respectively of the charity East Anglia Children’s Hospices, and the Duchess has attended the Houghton Hall horse trials with her children.

The memorial includes several elements the Duke had planned for his funeral at St George’s Chapel in Windsor Castle in April last year but which were forbidden by Covid restrictions at the time. 

Among them is the involvement of Duke of Edinburgh (DofE) gold award winners and Sea Cadets, his expressed wish for the congregation to sing the rousing hymn Guide Me, O Thou Great Redeemer, and for clergy from the royal estates of Windsor, Sandringham and Balmoral to play a special part.

His funeral at St George’s Chapel in Windsor was limited to just 30 mourners in the midst of the pandemic and mass singing was banned, with the Queen sitting alone in a mask.

Around 1,800 guests are due at today’s service, including British and European royalty, representatives of the many charities of which the duke was patron or president, Boris and Carrie Johnson, and Sir David Attenborough.

But the Duke and Duchess of Sussex are not returning from the US for the service

The Queen has recently been forced to pull out of a string of engagements because of ill health and old age. 

She was unable to attend the Commonwealth Day service this month because of concerns about her mobility and comfort. 

The memorial includes several elements the Duke had planned for his funeral at St George's Chapel in Windsor Castle in April last year but which were forbidden by Covid restrictions at the time. William and Kate are pictured with their children today

The memorial includes several elements the Duke had planned for his funeral at St George’s Chapel in Windsor Castle in April last year but which were forbidden by Covid restrictions at the time. William and Kate are pictured with their children today 

Palace and Abbey aides are thought to have taken steps to ensure that the service, to be televised live on BBC One, is less taxing for the Queen.  

The service will gave thanks for the duke’s dedication to family, nation and Commonwealth and recognise the importance of his legacy in creating opportunities for young people, promoting conservation, and supporting the Armed Forces.

One of the elements planned for the funeral which has now been included in the service will see nine Gold Award holders from The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award, plus representatives from UK Cadet Force Associations, line entry routes into Westminster Abbey.

Philip, who died in April last year aged 99, launched the DofE Award in 1956 and was Colonel-in-Chief of the Army Cadet Force, a role he first took up in 1953.

A tenth DofE gold award holder, Doyin Sonibare, 28, from London, will give a tribute to His Royal Highness’s legacy, recognising the impact of the Award on young people across the globe.

The Very Reverend Dr David Hoyle, Dean of Westminster, will conduct the service and describe the duke in the Bidding as ‘a man of rare ability and distinction’ who ‘ever directed our attention away from himself.’

He will say: ‘He put privilege to work and understood his rank as a spur to service. Working at pace, with so many claims on his attention, he encouraged us to focus, as he was focussed, on the things that matter.

‘His was a discipline and character that seized opportunity and overcame obstruction and difficulty. We recall, with affection and respect, the sustained offering of a long life lived fully.’ 

It was the duke’s expressed wish that clergy from Windsor, Sandringham and Balmoral – known as The Queen’s domestic chaplains – played a part in his funeral service, but this was not possible due to the Covid restrictions.

Today the Reverend Kenneth MacKenzie Minister of Crathie Church, the regular place of worship of the British royal family when they are in residence at nearby Balmoral Castle, the Reverend Canon Jonathan Riviere, the Rector of Sandringham, and the Reverend Canon Martin Poll, Chaplain to the Royal Chapel of All Saints, Windsor Great Park, will offer prayers recognising Philip’s energy, spirit of adventure and ‘good stewardship of the environment’.

The service will also be attended by around 30 foreign royals, including Prince Albert of Monaco, Denmark’s Queen Margrethe, King Harald and Queen Sonja of Norway, and Spain’s King Felipe VI and Queen Letizia.

Queen sheds a tear for beloved Philip: Emotional monarch wears green in tribute to late husband at Westminster Abbey memorial attended by Kate, Wills, Charles and Camilla… a year after sitting alone at his funeral at height of the pandemic 

 By MARTIN ROBINSON, CHIEF REPORTER and MARK DUELL and DANNY HUSSAIN FOR MAILONLINE

The Queen shed a tear for Prince Philip at an extraordinary service in remembrance of his remarkable life of service to Britain and his wife today.

Her Majesty stood in Westminster Abbey where she had personally ensured her beloved husband’s final wishes were fulfilled after his covid-hit funeral left her sat alone without the rousing hymns and guests he loved so much.

The 95-year-old monarch used a stick as she was walked to her seat by her disgraced son the Duke of York to give her ‘strength and stay’ Philip the final farewell he had wanted. The service was attended by the Royal Family and his relatives, friends and people who benefitted from his charities. Prince Harry and Meghan Markle were the only senior royals not there.

Despite battling mobility problems, she stood to pray and sing anthems during a 40-minute service that her husband of 73 years had helped plan for before his death last April. But in a controversial decision she chose Prince Andrew to support her as she arrived and left the church, clutching his elbow with one hand and a walking stick with the other.

The Queen had stood with tears in her eyes as the 1,800-strong congregation sang Guide Me O Thou Great Redeemer before the bells of Westminster Abbey rang out to mark the end of the memorial service for the Duke of Edinburgh.

After she leant on Andrew as she walked back out of the church, the Queen appeared to grimace as she walked to the car hunched over with the Duke of York at her side guiding her towards the Bentley.

She appeared to be holding tightly to her stick and appeared to be making a great effort to get to the vehicle, concentrating very hard in taking each step. Once inside the car she appeared to be back to her normal composed self as the car slowly drove away. She waved to onlookers as she arrived and left the service.

The Queen and the packed abbey had listened as the Dean of Windsor paid tribute to Philip’s intellect, work ethic, sense of humour and devotion to his family.

The Right Reverend David Conner described the duke as a ‘remarkable man’ who was committed to ‘a host of down-to-earth enterprises’. He pointed out that the duke could be ‘abrupt’, and suggested that at times he could forget ‘just how intimidating he could be’.

Princess Beatrice was seen to give a small chuckle as the Dean remarked: ‘He could be somewhat sharp in pricking what he thought to be bubbles of pomposity or sycophancy.’ But then appeared to break down in tears, covering her face with the order of service.

The Queen, the Duchess of Cornwall and the Princess Royal were all dressed in dark green in a subtle tribute to Philip, whose livery colour was Edinburgh Green. A number of others throughout the congregation also wore the shade, including Duke of Edinburgh Gold Award holder Doyin Sonibare who delivered a special tribute about the effect Philip’s youth scheme had on her life.

Flowers at today’s service are a patriotic red, white and blue, at Her Majesty’s request. They included dendrobium orchids, which also featured in the Queen’s wedding bouquet, and eryngium – or sea holly – echoing the duke’s career in the Royal Navy and lifelong affection for the sea. There were also multiple tributes to his intellect, work ethic, sense of humour and devotion to his family and his country.

The Queen stood and shed a tear for her husband today at an extraordinary service in remembrance of his life

The Queen stood and shed a tear for her husband today at an extraordinary service in remembrance of his life

The Queen closed her eyes in prayer as she joined senior royals to pay tribute to Prince Philip at his memorial at Westminster Abbey The Queen was tearful as she attended the memorial service at Westminster Abbey today for her late husband Prince Philip

The Queen closed her eyes in prayer as she joined senior royals to pay tribute to Prince Philip at his memorial at Westminster Abbey. When she opened her eyes they appeared moist

Her Majesty stands to sing surrounded by her family with the Duke of York also on the front row.From left to right, front row: Queen Elizabeth II, the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall, the Princess Royal, Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence, the Duke of York, The Earl of Wessex, the Countess of Wessex, Lady Louise Mountbatten-Windsor and Viscount Severn. (Second row left to right) The Duke of Cambridge, Prince George, Princess Charlotte, the Duchess of Cambridge, Peter Phillips, Isla Phillips, Savannah Phillips, Mia Tindall, Zara Tindall and Mike Tindall

Princess Beatrice was overwhelmed by the service. Stood behind the Queen she cried and covered her face with the order of service Princess Beatrice was overwhelmed by the service. Stood behind the Queen she cried and covered her face with the order of service

Princess Beatrice was overwhelmed by the service. Stood behind the Queen she cried and covered her face with the order of service as her grandmother removed her glasses

Her Majesty walked with the help of a stick but stood without support sat next to Charles, Camilla, Anne and her husband Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence. Across the aisle was Prince Andrew

Her Majesty walked with the help of a stick but stood without support sat next to Charles, Camilla, Anne and her husband Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence. Across the aisle was Prince Andrew

The Queen arrives at the service holding the Duke of York by the elbow with her left hand and her stick with the right

The Queen arrives at the service holding the Duke of York by the elbow with her left hand and her stick with the right

Andrew escorted her to her seat in an extraordinary moment that may have upset other royals. None of the other royals appeared to look up when they arrived

Andrew escorted her to her seat in an extraordinary moment that may have upset other royals. None of the other royals appeared to look up when they arrived

Her Majesty had arrived at the side door of the church, allowing her to walk a shorter distance from Poets’ Corner to the front where she was surrounded by her children and grandchildren. She stood at various points in the service, despite her own admission recently that she is struggling to move.

Westminster Abbey was completely packed today to celebrate the 99-year life of Prince Philip as Her Majesty battled mobility issues and fought off covid to be there to say goodbye to her husband after 73 years of marriage.

The event, attended by most of the Duke of Edinburgh’s family and many of Europe’s most senior royals, is in the starkest of contrasts to his pared back funeral at Windsor last April when Her Majesty said goodbye to her strength and stay after 73 years of marriage.

The Queen finally decided to attend today’s service in Central London around two hours before but the coverage of the Service of Thanksgiving was dominated by her extraordinary decision to travel with her disgraced son Prince Andrew from Windsor Castle to Central London.

Timothy Laurence and Anne, Princess Royal, arriving ahead of the Service of Thanksgiving for the life of Prince Philip

Timothy Laurence and Anne, Princess Royal, arriving ahead of the Service of Thanksgiving for the life of Prince Philip

Prince Charles and his wife Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall, arrive at Westminster Abbey

Prince Charles and his wife Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall, arrive at Westminster Abbey

The Duke's family ahead of the service: In the second row is Peter Philips with daughters Savannah and Isla. Next to them is Mia Tindall with parents Zara Philips and Mike Tindall. In the front row are Prince Edward and Sophie Wessex with children Lady Louise and James, Viscount Severn

The Duke’s family ahead of the service: In the second row is Peter Philips with daughters Savannah and Isla. Next to them is Mia Tindall with parents Zara Philips and Mike Tindall. In the front row are Prince Edward and Sophie Wessex with children Lady Louise and James, Viscount Severn

The Cambridges arrived shortly after Prince Charles and Camilla ahead of today's memorial service for Prince Philip at Westminster Abbey

The Cambridges arrived shortly after Prince Charles and Camilla ahead of today’s memorial service for Prince Philip at Westminster Abbey

Kate Middleton arrives at Westminster Abbey for the memorial service to Prince Philip today. She was joined by Prince William and her children George and Charlotte

Kate Middleton arrives at Westminster Abbey for the memorial service to Prince Philip today. She was joined by Prince William and her children George and Charlotte

Princess Charlotte and Prince George sit with the mother the Duchess of Cambridge during today's service at Westminster Abbey

Princess Charlotte and Prince George sit with the mother the Duchess of Cambridge during today’s service at Westminster Abbey

The Queen remained seated during the service with aides taking special measures to ensure her comfort after recent heath issues

The Queen remained seated during the service with aides taking special measures to ensure her comfort after recent heath issues

Queen Máxima and King Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands left the service at Westminster Abbey arm-in-arm

Queen Máxima and King Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands left the service at Westminster Abbey arm-in-arm 

Queen Letizia of Spain, 49, left the service for Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh in an emerald dress

Despite her frailty, Queen Elizabeth II stands during a Service of Thanksgiving for the life of the Duke of Edinburgh, at Westminster Abbey today

Her Majesty was determined to be amongst the 1,800 guests despite the 95-year-old’s mobility problems that have prevented her doing a major public engagement away from Windsor Castle in nearly six months. The Tindalls were the first close family to arrive, followed Princess Anne, the Wessexes, Prince Charles and his wife Camilla and then the Cambridges, who were with their children George and Charlotte. The Queen was the last to arrive with Andrew.

It was a move that royal watchers believe may have upset her son Prince Charles and grandson Prince William – both instrumental in the decision to take away the Duke of York’s ‘HRH’.

The Queen chose her second son to join her in the back of her royal car for the 22-mile journey and he was also given a front row in the church, right next to his other siblings at the service just weeks after he paid millions to one of Jeffrey Epstein’s sex slaves, Virginia Roberts Giuffre, who accused him of having sex with her three times when she was trafficked to London aged 17.

The Queen’s state limousine arrived at Poets’ Yard entrance with Andrew sat beside her. As they walked through the famous section of the abbey towards her seat, in a small procession, the monarch held onto her son’s elbow with her left hand and had a walking stick in her right.

They walked at a slow but steady pace both looking ahead, and at the end of the aisle they separated – with Andrew giving a last glance to his mother as she turned right. After the first hymn, Charles, who was sat next to her mother, could be seen leaning over to speak to the Queen seated next to him – but it is not clear what was said. The Queen then delved into her black Launer handbag for her glasses to read the order of service.

After the 40 minute service, Her Majesty was escorted out of the abbey by the Duke of York. As the monarch stopped to greet Duke of Edinburgh Gold Award holder Doyin Sonibare, Andrew stood back and at one point broke into a smile.

The Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall were the first to leave Westminster Abbey alongside the abbey’s chapter.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge followed. All four royals waved at the crowd outside as they were driven away in black cars.